11 Tips on Taking Drugs and Medication with Arthritis

Taking medication on a daily or weekly basis is a reality for most people with arthritis to control arthritis pain and inflammation. But with such a wide array of options available, finding the right combinations of treatments that work for you can be tricky.

arthritis treatments

11 Tips on Taking Drugs and Medication with Arthritis

Understanding what each individual type of  arthritis drug does and what side-effects it can cause is no mean feat either. However there are a number of steps you can follow to help ensure you are taking medication safely.

Many people have their own safety checklists that they consult when they discover a new drug or treatment. At Arthritis Ireland, we have drawn up a checklist of our own based on the thoughts and advice of both healthcare professionals and people living with arthritis.

1. Take time to discuss possible side effects of your medication with your doctor – it will help you weigh up the risks and benefits of a treatment.
2. Keep a list of all the drugs you are taking. Let your doctor or pharmacist see this before you start on any new treatment – even ‘over-the-counter’ medicines including vitamins, creams, gels and rubs etc.
3. Some drugs affect your immune system and can leave you prone to infection. So it is important to report any new symptoms to your doctor without delay.
4. Expect to have your blood and urine tested regularly, before and during your treatment. Other tests such as chest X-rays may also be needed.
5. Follow the instructions for taking your medication – keeping to the correct dose and times, and noting whether your tablets are best taken with or without food.
6. Always read the leaflet enclosed with medicines carefully.
7. Some drugs used by people with arthritis can affect fertility in men and women, and be harmful if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Always check with your doctor first.
8. With some drugs you may need to avoid alcohol or reduce your intake. Ask your doctor for advice.
9. If you miss a dose, don’t try to catch up by taking more next time. Ask your doctor or pharmacist what you should do.
10. Immunisation against flu and pneumonia is recommended for everyone taking immunosuppressants, anti-TNFs and steroid tablets. Immunisations involving live vaccines
such as polio and rubella should be avoided. Ask your doctor for more information.
11. Remember, if one drug doesn’t work for you, or you get severe side effects, this won’t necessarily happen with them all. Ask for regular medication reviews, persevere and work with your doctor to find a treatment that suits you.

For more information on drugs and treatments, including information specific to NSAIDS, DMARDS and Biologics, download the Arthritis Ireland Drugs and Complementary Therapies information booklet.

10 Tips on Working with Arthritis

Working with Arthritis, Parenting with Arthritis

Young Arthritis Seminars

We have all heard the well-known adage that work is good for your health, but when you have a musculoskeletal disorder, like arthritis, it does not always ring true.

Whether your job is physically demanding or you are sitting at a desk all day, work can have an adverse effect on your joints and posture. Fortunately, there are things you can do to reduce the strain your body is under at work.

Arthritis Ireland is running a number of Young Arthritis Seminars around the country for young people (aged 18-40) living with arthritis, which will focus on the topics of pregnancy and parenting with arthritis and working with arthritis.

The second of a two part series on the new Arthritis Ireland Blog will focus on working with arthritis with 10 key things to keep in mind in the office.

  1. Plan and prioritise tasks, completing most important first. Pacing yourself throughout the day will conserve your energy, reducing pain and fatigue.
  2. Stop before you get tired. Bad habits creep in when a person is tired and not concentrating.
  3. Leave working splints in your drawer and use when needed. They will assist in relieving pain and increasing strength of joints.
  4. Adapt your work station for your individual needs. Using ergonomic keyboards, mouse, chair and desk will reduce strain on your body.
  5. Avoid prolonged standing or sitting positions to minimize muscle stiffness, pain and fatigue. Use a timer on your phone to remind you to change position.
  6. Complete stretching exercises when seating such as ankle rotations, wrist rotations and shoulder rotations, circle the joint in one direction for several seconds, and then change direction
  7. Utilise heat e.g. hot water bottle or ice packs to reduce pain and inflammation.
  8. Discuss options for flexibility in work schedules and tasks with your employer to allow you to plan for changes in function that come with an arthritis flare up e.g. if you find the mornings difficult explore possibility of working flexitime.
  9. Explore the possibility of adapting your role, cutting down on tasks you find most difficult or transferring to a different role within your workplace.
  10. Utilise peer support e.g. discuss matters with your line manager, occupational health specialist and other young people with arthritis through the Young Arthritis Network!

The Young Arthritis Seminars will feature expert speakers, including rheumatologists, clinical nurse specialists, occupational therapists and patients, who will focus on pregnancy and parenting with arthritis (click here to read 10 tips on parenting blog post) and working with arthritis.

The events will take place in:

  • Athlone: Sheraton Hotel, Saturday 19th January, 11am.
  • Dublin: The Gresham Hotel, Sunday 20th January, 11am.
  • Cork: Maldron Hotel, Saturday 2nd February, 11am.

Admission is free. Click here for more information or contact Laura Hickey on (01)6470208 or email lhickey@arthritisireland.ie.